What is the Business of the Church?

I wrote the following response to Elwood Yoder’s blog post, “Let’s Get on With Church” published several weeks ago on “The Mennonite” website. The magazine has posted a shorter version of this piece, along with a response from Yoder. My original post is below in its entirety. Thanks to “The Mennonite” for linking to my original piece. — Jeremy

Every so often, an editorial in a church magazine or a blog post will express the desire to get past rancorous debates in the body of Christ and return to the business of being the church. These editorials lament the divisions within congregations and conferences. They call on brothers and sisters in Christ to lay aside their petty controversies. They urge the church to turn back to the essentials of what it really means to follow Christ. The church, they argue, needs to focus on the true business of the church and leave worldly concerns to the world.

Elwood Yoder’s editorial from a few weeks ago represents the latest example in this genre. In this piece, he describes a collegiate district meeting of the Virginia Mennonite Conference that did not focus on church-wide debates, such as same-sex marriage and the abuse allegations against Luke Hartman. To Yoder’s relief, the meeting instead focused on capital improvements, a powerful devotional and reports on local ministry efforts. Rather than feeling burdened by the “issues of the day in the denomination” Yoder left the meeting “refreshed, motivated, and inspired to be engaged in the work of the church.” As is typical in this genre, Yoder calls on Mennonites to “be about the business of the church, work together, and so challenge the shrill debates so commonplace in our wider culture.”

As a pastor, I am tempted by Yoder’s pastoral and pleasant description of a church meeting. I also sometimes experience controversy fatigue. But I reject Yoder’s implication that sexual abuse and LGBTQ inclusion are not an essential business of the church. When we treat people as if they are side issues or problems that the church can choose to ignore, we no longer follow the Jesus Christ who ate with prostitutes and healed lepers. When we ignore those whose identities and experiences make us uncomfortable, we no longer follow the Jesus who healed on the Sabbath and outraged the priests and Pharisees. When we choose our comfort zone as the basis of ministry, we no longer follow the Jesus Christ who died on the cross and told us to pick up our own crosses to follow him.

What then is the business of the church? What is our business in the aftermath of the Orlando massacre? What is our business following the police murders of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile? What is our business in light of the violence committed against Lauren Shifflett? When we define the church’s business to not include those violent realities that exist both within and around our congregations, we disembody the lived experiences of individuals and communities that don’t fit within comfort zones. We turn people into issues. Continue reading “What is the Business of the Church?”

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What is the Business of the Church?

GeekCross: 28: The Accidental Activist

GeekCross CoverJeremy speaks with activist Tanya DePass, creator of #INeedDiverseGames and cohost of the gaming podcast Fresh Out of Tokens. Topics include: “accidental” activism; the one year anniversary of Michael Brown’s death; race in America; the Emanuel AME shootings; the beliefs and practices of the Ásatrú faith; and representation of Norse paganism in Marvel comics and films.

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Note:
Tanya will be on two panel discussions at Wizard World Chicago, August 22-23, 2015

GeekCross is a McLearan Production

GeekCross: 28: The Accidental Activist

GeekCross 27: Can You Explain Tentacle Porn to Me?

GeekCross CoverJeremy talks with Seventh Day Adventist minister Kevin Kakazu on Adventist beliefs, diversity in the church and the giant robots of Kevin’s childhood. Topics include: the “disappointing” origins of Adventism, representation of Japanese culture in geekdom, anime’s broad thematic range, the connection between faith and geekdom and the importance of Sabbath.

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GeekCross is a McLearan Production

GeekCross 27: Can You Explain Tentacle Porn to Me?

GeekCross 25: Girls Can Love Princesses and Also Be Geeks

GeekCross CoverJeremy talks with Aleen Simms of Less Than or Equal about her podcast and advocacy for diversity in Geekdom. We also reflect on what we’ve learned as podcasters. Topics include: pastor stereotypes, the challenges of social change, the many sins of LEGO and raising girls to love both princesses and geek stuff.

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GeekCross is a McLearan Production

GeekCross 25: Girls Can Love Princesses and Also Be Geeks